Some Data on the Current Use of PowerPoint – Slide Counts

This post is an excerpt from „Visu­al Logor­r­hea – On the Pre­v­a­lence of Sli­de­u­m­ents”. In order to get an impres­si­on of the cur­rent use of Power­Point for pre­sen­ta­ti­on design, 1.500 pre­sen­ta­ti­ons found on the inter­net have been ana­ly­zed. Read the full story here.

Slide Counts

About half of the pre­sen­ta­ti­on files in the sam­ple con­tain 20 sli­des or less. An average pre­sen­ta­ti­on con­sists of x̄ = 25.4 sli­des with a surpris­ingly high spread (s = 23.7) and a medi­an of Md = 20. Only about 10% of the slide decks are lar­ger than 45 sli­des.

Some Data on the Current Use of PowerPoint - Slide Counts

Guy Kawasaki’s advice of a maxi­mum of ten sli­des is only met by 19.4% of the pre­sen­ta­ti­ons. This fin­ding is not remar­kab­le at all, becau­se Kawasaki’s recom­men­da­ti­on clear­ly focu­ses on pit­ches held in front of ven­ture capi­ta­lists – a focus which might be sha­red by very few of the pre­sen­ta­ti­ons in the sam­ple ana­ly­zed.

The fact that there are only a few very long pre­sen­ta­ti­ons is almost cer­tain­ly rela­ted to the obvious truth that time cons­traints are the limi­ting fac­tor for pre­sen­ta­ti­on length (and con­se­quent­ly are an indi­rect limit for the slide count). This limit appears to be wide­ly under­s­tood by peop­le crea­ting slide decks.

This post is an excerpt from „Visu­al Logor­r­hea – On the Pre­v­a­lence of Sli­de­u­m­ents”. In order to get an impres­si­on of the cur­rent use of Power­Point for pre­sen­ta­ti­on design, 1.500 pre­sen­ta­ti­ons found on the inter­net have been ana­ly­zed. Read the full story here.

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