Some Data on the Current Use of PowerPoint – Line Counts

This post is an excer­pt from „Visual Logor­rhea – On the Pre­va­len­ce of Sli­de­u­ments”. In order to get an impres­si­on of the cur­rent use of Power­Point for pre­sen­ta­ti­on desi­gn, 1.500 pre­sen­ta­ti­ons found on the inter­net have been ana­ly­zed. Read the full story here.

Line Counts

An aver­a­ge slide in our sam­ple has x̄ = 8 lines of text (s = 6.8, Md = 8), and about half of the sli­des (49.0%) have seven or less lines of text and hence honor the „rule” of the „magi­cal num­ber seven”. Only 10% are packed with 15 or more lines of text. Remem­be­ring that 8% of the sli­des are title sli­des (see above), we can con­clu­de that near­ly two thirds of the sli­des are packed with too much text and thus almo­st cer­tain­ly dis­tract from the spo­ken con­tent.

Some Data on the Current Use of PowerPoint - Line Counts

Sur­pri­sin­gly, there is no cor­re­la­ti­on bet­ween the num­ber of sli­des in a pre­sen­ta­ti­on and the aver­a­ge num­ber of words per slide (r = 0.0178). There is neit­her an indi­ca­ti­on that peop­le forced to pre­sent only a limi­t­ed amount of sli­des tend to put more con­tent on their sli­des nor that peop­le crea­ting pre­sen­ta­ti­ons made of many sli­des also incli­ne towards using many words on their sli­des.

This post is an excer­pt from „Visual Logor­rhea – On the Pre­va­len­ce of Sli­de­u­ments”. In order to get an impres­si­on of the cur­rent use of Power­Point for pre­sen­ta­ti­on desi­gn, 1.500 pre­sen­ta­ti­ons found on the inter­net have been ana­ly­zed. Read the full story here.

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